Dive deep into Julia Kristeva’s Strangers to Ourselves with extended analysis, commentary, and discussion. The most intense forms of estrangement experienced by the subject, according to Julia Kristeva, are those produced by poetic language. For while its origins are. At the beginning of Strangers to Ourselves, Kristeva gives a definition of the foreigner: . ‘Julia Kristeva in Conversation with Rosalind Coward’.

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Strangers to Ourselves

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This book is concerned with the notion of the “stranger” -the foreigner, outsider, or alien in a country and society not their own- as well as the notion of strangeness within the self -a person’s deep sense of being, as distinct from outside appearance and their conscious idea of self. Kristeva begins with the personal and moves outward by examining world literature and ph This book is concerned with the notion of the “stranger” -the foreigner, outsider, or alien in a country and society not their own- as well as the notion of strangeness within the self -a person’s deep sense of being, as distinct from outside appearance and their conscious idea of self.

Kristeva begins with the personal and moves outward by examining world literature and philosophy. She discusses the foreigner in Greek tragedy, in the Bible, and in the literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and the twentieth century.

She discusses the legal status of foreigners throughout history, gaining perspective on our own civilization. Her insights into the problems of nationality, particularly in France are more timely and relevant in an increasingly integrated and fractious world.

Paperback jluia, pages. Published June 10th by Columbia University Press first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Strangers to Ourselvesplease sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Strangers to Ourselves. Lists with This Book. Apr 30, Maksym Karpovets rated it liked it. Today this question might be felled of empty determinations. How could I behave? These problems were asked by ancient philosophers, but in modern culture they are essential again as every fundamental issue. It seems that Kristeva deeply understands the meaning of question strsngers she also correctly asks us about identity.

But farther and farter it gets harder to understand where she sees the ti answers. The most interesting sections of this work are the earliest chapters. Kristeva seems to run out of steam and stop abruptly once she begins to discuss foreignness and strangeness in contemporary culture.

She analyzes her own experience in France and says that not really feels like atrangers home. There is a closed cycle: Nevertheless, the consummate name of juliq freedom is solitude. In this case it helpfully to read the Chapter 4 Knowing who we are where Kristeva tries to understand not only cultural or social roots of our identity, but tries to examine ontological basis of it.

The main thesis of this and next chapters is that we are often wrong about why we do something and even about how we felt. The author reminds us about Cartesian tradition of subject and its feelings. Yet, I guess it is the wrong way where have been juulia crashed many modern projects include the project of identity. This book tp helped me to realize how extremely we depend from our cultural background. When we try to run away from our culture we must rebuild not only ourselvesbut also others.

Strangers to Ourselves by Julia Kristeva

And every time it looks like endless game with mirrors. Sep 17, Erdem Tasdelen rated it it was ok. The problem that I had with this book is that it takes what appears to be a personal experience and universalizes that experience as one of strangegs foreigners.

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The language that is employed here almost seems like it would work better as an autobiography or fiction. As charming as it may be to read about how the perception of the foreigner has kept changing in history, it fails to shed jhlia on the current agenda. The last two chapters of the book focus on a political solution that derives from psychoanalysis, stating that with Freud’s notion of the uncanny, one realizes the strangeness of oneself.

Kristvea result is thus a utopian wish for individuals to situate themselves as foreigners to themselves, the result of which is to embrace other individuals on account of this realization. There remains yet another point of doubt here for one who is skeptic of psychoanalysis. I am not convinced that emancipation for immigrants and exiles will be achieved through acceptance of psychoanalytic discourse. Nov 07, Carolyn rated it did not like it. A sad sack of induction fallacies. It horrifies me to hear Kristeva’s woebegone personal experiences projected into vague half-truths about the identity of the julua populace.

Her positioning of the foreigner as an Abject entity holds these people sgrangers bad faith, with the discourse of this novel only limiting the potential of the immigrant as a viable and autonomous entity.

Furthermore, constant citations of the Ancient Greek philosophic greats is grating and unoriginal. I shut this book with A sad sack of induction fallacies. I shut this book with a sour face. Nov 30, Reuben rated it liked it Shelves: It’s very late and I am incredibly tired so in lieu of a proper review I’ll bullet point some thoughts: This is without a doubt interesting, kriisteva it does not give Kristeva a lot of room to develop her over-arching thesis.

I was left feeling lost by the pertinence of som It’s very late and I am incredibly tired so in lieu of a proper review I’ll bullet point some thoughts: I was left feeling lost by the pertinence of some sections in relation to her point. Certain sections, mostly in the historical chunk krisreva the work, used such puffed up vocabulary that it took far srangers than should have been needed for me to tease out exactly what was being said.

At one point she goes on to posit how the foreigner can only be negatively described: In doing so, the remit of exactly what Kristeva is talking about is widened kkristeva include essentially anything resembling the concept of “otherness”.

She then pulls this together by suggesting that this otherness is projected from our own psychological sense of insecurity ,risteva other people, and by doing so everybody becomes a foreigner. Lurselves point seems completely non-sequitur to the preceding work, and is rested upon a foundation of Kristeva’s subjective feelings and infallible conjecturing about psychoanalysis.

Tsrangers this serves more as political history than as a substantive piece of philosophy. The main thesis is neatly-wrapped but nonetheless fails to surmount speciousness. A book that is at once highly acute and powerful in places and one that is myopic and lacking for scope and detail in other sections, but altogether, a very necessary book: Kristeva examines what it means to be a “stranger” or alien in another land, and as someone who came to Paris from her native Bulgaria as a graduate student, as someone who is both a linguist and a psychoanalyst and maintains an active clinical practiceKristeva is in a great place in so many ways to consider the plight of A book that is at once highly acute and powerful in places and one that is myopic and lacking for scope and detail in other sections, but altogether, a very necessary book: Kristeva examines what it means to be a “stranger” or alien in another land, and as someone who came to Paris from her native Bulgaria as a graduate student, as someone who is both a linguist and a psychoanalyst and maintains an active clinical practiceKristeva is in a great place in so many ways to consider the plight of the stranger in a strange land.

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The opening section “Toccata and Fugue for the Foreigner” is widely anthologized and a great piece of writing that can stand on its own while the chapter on Paul and Augustine is also very good. Where Kristeva is less skilled is when she speaks of our contemporary times or, at least, the times a few decades ago when the book was written: Also, she tilts her earlier arguements towards promoting a European Union-like unity of all nations and peoples which may sound nice in a Disney sort of way on the surface but is ungainly kristev the scope of this book.

She simply toys ojrselves ideas that deserve far more development than she’s willing or able to provide them—if they are to make sense and be winning arguments. That said, Kristeva often shines—as in the first section or her consideration of Rabelais and the Renaissance. She is able to pin down a lot of diverse places in history where elements came together in a manner to promote a wider view of who and what is “foreign” and who and what is domestic and also does a good job explaining the French mindset of national polity and expansion.

There are though places where this book never measures up to the greatness you’d expect from Kristeva on this topic. Kristteva all her works, if your French is up for it, read it in the original French. Inizio a leggere i giornali, a scrivere e a cancellare quel che ho scritto, che avverto purselves banale e inadeguato rispetto a quello che stiamo vivendo. Feb 24, Leonard Pierce rated it liked it Shelves: Kristeva’s meditation on the foreigner as a double of our own inner self isn’t as lively and precise as some of her best work, but it’s still very perceptive and worth a read.

The notion that the foreigner returns to us as a dark reflection of our inner being, and that we can only love or hate them to the degree that we accept or reject ourselves, is supported by many examples from antiquity to the modern era most especially, and obviously, Camus and Sartre.

There’s a final section, seemingly Kristeva’s meditation on the foreigner as a double of our own inner self isn’t as lively and precise as some of her best work, but it’s still very perceptive and worth a read.

There’s a final section, seemingly as relevant today as it was when she wrote the book almost 30 years ago, about the new wave of migrants to France, and concerns about assimilation, that she incorporates into her thesis. This all gets a bit abstract, and the language isn’t as commanding as “Powers of Horror”, largely thanks to a lot more psychoanalytical notions and jargon, but when she comes closest to the subject, you’re still seeing an amazing mind at work.

Jan 28, Laura C. R’lyeh rated it it was amazing. Mar 09, Sophie rated it it was ok. College professor study on what it means to be a stranger Ourwelves and in mythology and literature.

Strangers to Ourselves – Julia Kristeva – Google Books

Did not like the introduction at all Have paused, not sure I will resume. Sep 18, Kay rated it it was amazing Shelves: Being an outsider and knowing what happens with tribal issues of acceptance of those like me, I love the revelation of Kristeva’s exploration of otherness and kristevx validated for the first time. Kathleen rated it really liked it Apr 16, Teri Frame rated it liked it Dec 31, Duygu Ozmekik rated it really liked it Aug 05, Gina Hellman rated it it was amazing Jan 26, Iria rated it really liked it Sep 05, Soni rated it it was amazing Oct 10,