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Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Social Intercourse by Greg Howard. The Golden Boy, star quarterback with a slick veneer facing uncomfortable truths about himself and his past.

Hearts will be broken, new romance will bloom, but nothing will go down the way Beck and Jax have planned. In his hilarious and provocative debut, Greg Howard examines the challenges of growing up different in a small southern town through the lens of colorful and unforgettable characters who stay with you long after the last drop of sweet tea.

INTERCOURSE FOR DUMBOS BY D PDF DOWNLOAD

Hardcoverpages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Social Intercourseplease sign up. Chloe Wilson Yeah, there’s definitely some biphobia from what I’ve seen. See 2 questions about Social Intercourse…. Lists with This Book. Jul 07, Max Baker rated it it was ok Shelves: Thank You Edelweiss for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest review There are some stories that just make you feel like you need to take a shower afterwards.

All of those instances require a visceral and emotional response from the reader and, usually, the story is written with that in mind. Social Intercourse made me want to take a shower, but in the worst way possible Social Intercourse m Thank You Edelweiss for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest review There are some stories that just make you feel like you need to take a shower afterwards.

Social Intercourse made me want to take a shower, but in the worst way possible Social Intercourse made me feel gross and it’s completely unintentional. There’s something that is just so wrong about this book and it is incredibly hard to pin down exactly what makes my skin crawl, because it’s not one thing.

It’s a lot of little things that really add up by the end of the novel. However, that’s not to say that this book was completely without merit. The ideas in Social Intercourse are good. A seemingly straight boy and an out and proud gay kid team up to end their parent’s relationship.

It’s a cute premise and I can see why the marketing uses the Parent Trap as one of it’s comp titles. But the execution and choices made are just so The two main characters were awful people.

Beckett and Jaxon were so selfish and so far up there own asses that it was a miracle they could do anything outside talk about their own issues.

I’m all for femme guys in my LGBT YA, it’s one of the things I actively look for, but Beckett was a certain type of insufferable that just got on every one of my nerves. He was so holier than thou, so sure of his own superiority and righteousness that he never once seemed to care about anyone. Everything he did was to further either his own agenda or butter someone up so they could be used later.

And all of this was wrapped in a characterization I could have loved. Beckett was so comfortable with himself, but he was so selfish and awful and never did an once of introspection until the eleventh hour.

The kid seriously made his father’s girlfriend think his father hit him just so he could ruin their relationship. He was hypocritical at ever step of the way and, like Beckett, only changed at the eleventh hour because he got caught and not because he actually wanted or tried too. Not to mention is constant “Bro-ness” as a foil for Beckett’s more “obvious” gay characteristics were clearly just that; a way to contrast the two characters without really giving them a personality.

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And that’s not even mentioning the total biphobia from both of them. I swear if they talked about “not putting a label on anything ” or “I can’t like him because he might leave me for someone with a vagina” one more time I was legitimately going to scream. By the time Jaxon finally said the word bisexual, I was convinced that they were just gonna say “Beckett-sexual” or something stupid like that, because they had spent so much time trying to not-so-subtly convince the reader that it was something else.

This book could have worked. It could have been a light-hearted read about two boys caught in a situation neither was happy with but tried their hardest to work with it for the ones they loved.

Instead it intercoyrse something about two gross people who thought they knew better then everyone else in the room. Jun 30, Katie B rated it really liked it Shelves: There were a few things about the book that I wasn’t thrilled about but overall I enjoyed this YA novel featuring lgbt characters.

Teenage boy Beck loves watching The Golden Girls with his straight and single dad. Being out and proud isn’t very easy when you live in a conservative Southern town. Jaxon, is xumbos star athlete at yb high school and his two mothers have recently split up. When Beck’s father and Jaxon’s mother, Tracee, start dating, neither boy is very happy about it. They set out to There were a few things about the book that I wasn’t thrilled about but overall I enjoyed this YA novel featuring lgbt characters.

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They set out to break up the relationship but nothing seems to go according to plan. I absolutely loved the chemistry between the two boys. And I do like the message of the book which was love who you love and don’t worry about labels. While the book tackled lgbt issues there were also other topics brought up including divorce and adoption.

I do think the author was overly ambitious and tried too hard to include every single issue a lgbt teen might face.

The weakest part was the story line involving the pastor as it just didn’t seem to fit in as well with everything else. There are definitely some things about this book that were hard to read. Beck in particular was very hard to like at times as he was very shallow and misogynistic.

I guess you can decide for yourself if it was a realistic depiction of a teenager or he was just a jerk. At the very least there did appear to be some growth by him by the end of the book. I also wasn’t a big fan of Tracee and some of the things she said about her son to other people and the scene where she is waiting in Beck’s bedroom is a complete wtf moment. This is the type of book that I would love to hear more from the author about the writing process and it would make an excellent book club selection because I think everyone is going to take away something different.

It’s also one of the few books in which I would love for there to be a sequel as I felt very invested in the characters by the end and would love to see what the future holds for the both of them. I won a free copy of this book from a ShelfAwareness giveaway but I was under no obligation to post a review.

All views expressed are my honest opinion. View all 6 comments. Jun 17, Tom rated it did not like it Shelves: I read an essay by the author where he talked about the tendency of LGBT YA books to steer away from sex and their protagonists are typically, for lack of a better term, “straightpassing”, which I definitely agree with so I thought this book would be a pretty good read.

In the first chapter, apart from casual cissexism and misogyny among other things, there’s like a page at the very end of it with a woman who is referred to as “a thing” the whole time and “a whore” a couple times thro I read an essay by the author where he talked about the tendency of LGBT YA books to steer away from sex and their protagonists are typically, for lack of a better term, “straightpassing”, which I definitely agree with so I thought this book would be a pretty good read.

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In the first chapter, apart from casual cissexism and misogyny among other things, there’s like a page at the very end of it with a woman who is referred to as “a thing” the whole time and “a whore” a couple times throughout it. That pretty much did it for me to be honest, but I still read the whole book. Misogyny, cissexism, biphobia, transphobia, racism; you name it, this book probably has it.

The two protagonists are just not likable. Beckett in general is such a hypocritical character. He doesn’t like when Jax’s mom uses the t slur but is regularly transphobic and never shows any sign of learning not to be.

You’re supposed to think he cares about women but is constantly incredibly misogynistic towards those he doesn’t like. Tracee especially is a constant target of his for the sole reason that she’s dating his dad and he really only stops thinking of her as a whore, or “Big Tits” as he calls her in his head, when he starts getting friendly with her son.

The fact that Beckett uses a detail from Jax’s abusive childhood that was clearly personal because Jax multiple times lied about not remembering to make Jax’s mother think that his father was abusing him did not help him. Now is this all probably a realistic portrayal of a cis white gay teen?

Yeah, but there’s just so much bigotry I can look past under that excuse. Jax is maybe not as awful from what we get on his point of view, but he also fakes a hate crime to scare his mom which is wildly inconsiderate, to say the least, of someone who isn’t straight himself.

Also, if the entirety of all that wasn’t enough, this book falls into the “closeted gays are the real homophobes” trope by having Beckett shut down the religious protesters of the LGBT prom by exposing their leading pastor for being gay.

I’m not sure what that scene was trying to achieve, other than maybe making us laugh at the religious fools who had to leave their hateful protest with their tails between their legs because the pastor turned out to be exactly what he preached against. I don’t think I laughed, though. I’m sure the intentions of this book were good, and I can’t say I don’t appreciate it for its honest portrayal of gay teenage sexuality, but those few positive details were heavily overshadowed by its flaws.

A few choice quotes: How can you just switch like that? Not in every case, mind you. Aug 26, Melissa Chambers rated it it was amazing. I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this book in return for an honest review. Get ready to laugh! This precious and hilarious story of an “out and proud” choir boy in small town South Carolina had me grinning from page one all the way through to the end. Told in dual POV, Beckett’s chapters kept me rolling on the floor, while Jaxon’s chapters were a bit more pensive, and a little steamy.

I want her as my own sidekick! She had me laughing cr.richard hardest and wantin I was lucky enough to receive an ARC of this book in return for an honest review. She had me laughing the hardest and wanting to give her bear hugs at the same time. I loved the special relationships each boy had with his family – Beckett with his dad and Jaxon with his two moms.